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SCREENING TIMES:  

Thu, 14 March: 21:10

Fri, 15 March: 14:40

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SCREENING TIMES: 

Fri, 15 March: 21:40

Sat, 16 March: 13:00

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SCREENING TIMES: 

Fri, 15 March, 13:00 

SCREENING TIMES: 
Thu, 14 March: 19:00

Sat, 16 March: 18:20

SCREENING TIMES: 

Fri, 15 March: 19:20

Sat, 16 March: 16:00

SCREENING TIMES:

Fri, 15 March, 16:40

Sat 16 March, 20:20

This program explores being queer and owning it. Queers are fighting harder than ever to be heard and to be seen.  Queer as Fuck presents an ecclectic selection of performative work by functionally diverse filmmakers. From intrinsically-rendered stories of forbidden love to the intersections of queerness, this collection of titillating, tender and subtle shorts represents an unashamed claim to beauty, desire, autonomy and, above all the love for oneself. We take a step back from the individual and explore the context in which the individual exists. We explore these stories through the eyes of a community, understanding where we come from, and looking at where we are going. This selection of films takes us into different worlds and experiences, from the personal assertion of existence to the defiant fights for our right to exist in the world. 

This strand gives insight into the social sphere of the queer community. Why do labels exist? Particularly in the queer community - part of being queer in 2018 is finding your tribe (if you want to label yourself). This sense of belonging is crucial to those who have been marginalised and isolated. The connections made with each other and coming together to be heard and speak out against injustice towards our communities. Sometimes all it takes is just relaxing and enjoying being around others who don’t question your existence. There’s a politics in campaigning together, and a politics in how we relate to each other which this selection of film gives insight to. 

In every work of art, we see traces of its creator (be it an aesthetic or a layer the artist’s creative output embedded into the personality of a character. As the definition of selfhood changes within the context of immersive digital experience and the increase of our identification with these digital mannerisms, so too does the idea of connection evolve and morph. PalaceMIX.exp is a unique and eccelectic selection of queer, experimental film and digital media exploring these ideas of connection and self image. Showcasing contemporary works by queer artists that explore how various aspects of queer identity portraiture play out within a variety of approaches to experimental cinema. This showcase is a part of our queer arts multi-disciplinary saturday night club event.

When one of these government android’s immunity breaks down and its pleasure centers are activated, the story becomes a tangled multi-thread plot and the ZERO GENs are caught among underground drug lords, glitched super agents, a scheming corporation and a corrupt government. Check yourself in as a fluid junkie for a super hyper viral ride.

A Brexit Special: Tilda Swinton stars in Cult queer film director Derek Jarman’s personal commentary on the decline of his country in a language closer to poetry than prose. A dark meditation on London under Thatcher. In 1987, in a world where where homosexuality and AIDs victims were looked down upon, Derek Jarman acted as a filmic spokesperson for those who remained marginalised. The Last of England is an angrily poetic, personal portrayal of a country that he saw, was in ruins. Through the experimental form, through the post-apocalyptic depiction of the country, Derek’s film dismantles the establishment and highlights the horrors of modern-day Britain through a dream-like state. Experience this unique screening with a live improvised score from The Palace Collective artists Joe Summers, Rosa Irvin-Clark and Thomas Summers.

Shakedown chronicles explicit performances in an underground lesbian club in Los Angeles. The story functions as a legend where money is both myth and material. Cumulatively, questions arise about how to diagram the before and after of a utopic moment. The film takes us inside a biweekly party at a Los Angeles club, founded by and for black queer women and featuring strips shows and explicit dancing. The Shakedown party was one of the few spaces where lesbian subcultures could flourish, being as much about the network that formed around it as it was about the economy that supported its organisers, performers and costume makers. The party ran for eight years before it was shut down by police.